On Co-teaching, Classroom Observation and Mark Fisher’s ‘Market Stalinism’

Introduction Co-teaching, for me, has been a continual source of curiosity, possibility and most of all, frustration. For most of my teaching career in Korea, I have not had to co-teach, but now that I am back in the public school system here, I am once again teaching with a partner. The contrast in the teaching … Continue reading On Co-teaching, Classroom Observation and Mark Fisher’s ‘Market Stalinism’

Code Switching in Global Relationships: A Brief Conversational Analysis

Introduction Part one of this two-part series set down some useful theoretical concepts for understanding the dynamics of power and authority in language use between international couples. This post reports on some preliminary data collected on myself and my wife. While the methodology isn't completely pure (more on that below), I was happy to find … Continue reading Code Switching in Global Relationships: A Brief Conversational Analysis

I’m not lesson planning because blog

My 7th graders recently spent some time trying to figure out the difference between “because ______” and “because OF _____” in preparation for their midterm tests.  It caused a whole lot of consternation, even though the answer is fairly straightforward and easy to follow. Simply, “because [reason]” is used to introduce a secondary clause; while … Continue reading I’m not lesson planning because blog

The one where I get Final Fantasy VII into a lesson

In my 7th graders textbook, the reading portion for our current chapter is focused on art history and linguistically on color/feeling words and “makes me feel” type phrases.  They are taught to associate colors with feelings and then make a commentary on a piece of artwork. (“The blue colors in this picture make me feel … Continue reading The one where I get Final Fantasy VII into a lesson

Language Exchange Lament (and a lesson plan for Listening)

There is a popular method for informal language learning here in South Korea (and I’m sure other places) that goes by the name “language exchange”.  The name is appealing.  It suggests a business-like approach to the learning of a language, a fair trade in which you give and then take equal shares of a product. … Continue reading Language Exchange Lament (and a lesson plan for Listening)