Developing A Practice of Concept-Based Instruction: Adverbs of Scale

1. Introduction: The Situation In the conversation classes that I teach, the books (Stretch, Oxford Books) often present grammar and other "skills" in a perplexing way. They present the form of the grammar or skill, without explaining anything very much about why the form is the way it is. Often any explanation is done with the phrase, "usually..." … Continue reading Developing A Practice of Concept-Based Instruction: Adverbs of Scale

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Tutorials: Digital and Tabletop game design perspectives

1. Introduction In his book "What digital games have to teach us about literacy and learning" James Paul Gee spends a fair amount of time discussing the need for tutorials in digital games. Without restating entirely his insight, Gee mentions that vernacular games in capitalistic societies are motivated in the most need-based, goal-oriented way possible to … Continue reading Tutorials: Digital and Tabletop game design perspectives

Game-Design Enhanced L2TL Review: Hyper Light Drifter

Introduction To this point in my game design enhanced foreign language teaching and learning (GD-L2TL) reviews I have not covered a traditional combat-oriented role-playing game (RPG). Hyper Light Drifter (henceforth HLD) will serve as the first in a two-game review that examines RPGs from two very different perspectives in order to mine them both for … Continue reading Game-Design Enhanced L2TL Review: Hyper Light Drifter

Making Functional Grammar Explicit: Game Design-Enhanced TBLT Lesson Plans for “Firewatch”

Introduction In our review of Firewatch, we concluded that it would make an excellent video game for Game Design-Enhanced TBLT (GD-TBLT). It's heavy narrative weight means that within the game there is a large amount of language and other literary devices that can be exploited for all kinds of learning, not just second language teaching and … Continue reading Making Functional Grammar Explicit: Game Design-Enhanced TBLT Lesson Plans for “Firewatch”

How Can Emotion-full Language Affect The Teacher/Student Relationship?: Evidence From Intercultural EFL Online Chat Tutoring

Introduction As the world becomes more interconnected, new methods in the study and practice of language learning are needed to account for the experience of a globalized world (Bloomaert, 2010) and the continual intertwining of technology into our lives at younger and younger ages (Pasfield-Neofitou, 2013). Simultaneously, teachers need to know not just the new … Continue reading How Can Emotion-full Language Affect The Teacher/Student Relationship?: Evidence From Intercultural EFL Online Chat Tutoring

What Kind of Creatures Are We?: Language

Introduction Noam Chomsky is getting older. He is undoubtably one of the most influential thinkers of contemporary philosophy and science. Though that may not itself be the most praiseworthy thing. But with age come synthesis and summary. Chomsky's latest writing outside of his political side have been this sort of writing. His book What Kind of … Continue reading What Kind of Creatures Are We?: Language

A Review of “Firewatch” for ESL/EFL Teaching

This review assess the potential for game-design enhanced second language teaching and learning of Firewatch. For background reading about the philosophical and linguistic-theoretic foundation for the approach used in this review, see here and here. Introduction Games for second language teaching and learning (L2TL) are very often used for very limited purposes. Something like "fun" or motivating language use. But as … Continue reading A Review of “Firewatch” for ESL/EFL Teaching

Code Switching in Global Relationships: A Brief Conversational Analysis

Introduction Part one of this two-part series set down some useful theoretical concepts for understanding the dynamics of power and authority in language use between international couples. This post reports on some preliminary data collected on myself and my wife. While the methodology isn't completely pure (more on that below), I was happy to find … Continue reading Code Switching in Global Relationships: A Brief Conversational Analysis

How We Hear Language: Representation and Direct Perception

...how different humans perceive speech sounds is another area for which our theories of perception must account. I hear and understand English, but not when I hear Mandarin; though I do, crucially, identify it as speech in a way that a Dolphin’s call is not. However do I, an English dominant speaker, hear Mandarin the same way a dominant Mandarin speaker does? And if not, why not?